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Preparing Your Lawn for Spring

Preparing Your Lawn for Spring


The frigid, dark days of winter are finally coming to a close. It’s (hopefully) time to stow the snow plows and start planning some spring cleaning! After months of lying dormant under cold snow these last few months, your grass, shrubbery, and trees are going to need some TLC. These simple steps from Ed Laflamme, a Landscape Industry Certified Manager in Connecticut, will help you get your lawn back to its lush vibrancy.

  1. Clean, clean, clean. The first step of preparing any lawn for spring is to get out there and rake up those leaves, twigs, and debris which can get stuck in your lawn mower and prevent fertilizers from being properly absorbed into the ground.
  2. Spread lawn fertilizer and pre-emergent herbicides in early spring to stop crabgrass from growing. Wait six to eight weeks, then apply these products again in combination with a weed killer to further prevent crabgrass from invading your lawn.
  3. Mow your lawn every five days during the first six weeks of spring, weather depending. One mistake many homeowners are guilty of is only mowing their lawn once a week in early spring. If grass grows too high, root growth will be stunted and grass will not grow properly.
  4. Once you have cleaned, fertilized, and mowed your lawn, it’s time to start edging your flower beds, rimming dead branches on shrubs, and replacing the mulch. Make sure to select a high quality, heavy mulch, such as a hardwood bark mulch, because it lasts longer.
  5. Now is also the time to start trimming your trees. The best time to do this is before leaves start to grow in, this way dead branches will be easier to spot and reach. If dead branches are left on trees they might fall and property damage or personal injury. It is recommended that homeowners hire a professional tree trimmer to do a “safety” prune at least once every three years.  
  6. Resist any temptation to fill brown patches of grass with seed. If you spread grass seed in spring, and you are also applying pre-emergent herbicides or weed killer, the seed will not germinate. Instead, spread fertilizer over the brown spots and shoots should start emerging within a few weeks. If the brown patches in your lawn are too big, or if you simply can’t wait, it is recommended that you lay out sod.

Source: searshomeservices.com